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Honeyshine

A design-inclined duo brings fresh perspective to Bryn Mawr

Nobody told the owners of Honeyshine, a new gift and design store located in the old Bryn Mawr garage, that glasses are typically displayed upright, one next to another.

For owners Adam Braun and Daisy Mitchell, who are new to retail, every object is an opportunity. So they placed toy soldiers inside modern drinking glasses, piled them in a bowl, and rimmed a few with colored sugar. Obviously.

“It’s always a collaboration. Our design is inherently about exploring different perspectives and approaches and then coming up with the most interesting solution,” says Mitchell, who met Braun in 2007 when the two worked together at an educational nonprofit. Friends with respect for each other’s tastes and values, they wanted to do something creative together.

“We focus on what we love and worry less about what we think people will buy,” Braun says. “It’s either extremely arrogant or just really honest. We like to think it’s the latter.”

Braun and Mitchell’s unabashed denial of retail convention makes the Honeyshine experience fresh, fun, and, at times, downright funny. You never know when you might find a doll’s head buried in moss beneath necklaces that dangle from a cloth bird’s neck. And then there’s Bruce, a mannequin in a goat mask who serves as store mascot. (He has a blog.)

Honeyshine is the sort of place you’ll feel delighted to have stumbled upon and eager to share with friends. Sure, there’s neat stuff to buy: delicate earrings, modern serving pieces, colorful bowls, and pillows. But, from the sunny yellow wall to greeting cards clipped to clothespins, it’s the whole experience you’ll wish you could take home. And, in fact, you can. Honeyshine offers design consultation, with an emphasis on re-imagining existing objects. It’s sort of like Honeyshine itself: two familiar words, combined in a clever new way. 414 Penn Ave. S., Mpls., 612-377-7300, honeyshine.net


How to Honeyshine your space:


1) Weird is good: Repurpose things that weren’t intended for home design. Garage sales and salvage stores are great places to find cool industrial objects that add some intrigue.
2) Less is more: Group objects you love by a common theme—color, shape, or style—and put the others away. When it starts to feel boring, switch to another group.
3) Layer: Use multiple levels on your tables, bookshelves, and mantle. Books, wood boxes, or suitcases give height and combine textures, which makes for a more interesting display.

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Ninety minutes of Honeyshine expertise is $65. After that, it’s $35 an hour. That includes styling, design ideas, and sourcing furniture and textiles. Honeyshine is also available for event design.

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