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Birding in Minnesota: A Guide For The Backyard Bird Watcher

Counting Crows . . . owls, finches, hawks, loons, ducks and every other bird species in Minnesota

Birding in Minnesota

BIRDS ON THE MOVE

According to a study by Climate Central, a nonprofit funded by NASA, the National Institutes of Health, and several other organizations, Minnesota’s annual temperature has risen two and a half degrees since 1970 and is projected to rise six to 10 degrees in the next 100 years. At the same time, a recent American Bird Conservancy report showed that birds in the United States have shifted their migration range an average of 65 miles north, with some species shifting as much as 400 miles north. In the future, this means that some species of birds will start summering so far north that they’ll no longer make an appearance in Minnesota, some will spend more time in Minnesota, and some homeowners in the southern half of the state will begin to see new types of birds at their feeders.

SOME NEW SPECIES THAT MAY START SHOWING UP IN MINNESOTA

Painted Bunting
Scissor-tail flycatcher
Cassin's sparrow
Say's phoebe
Great-tailed grackle

SOME BIRDS THAT MAY SPEND MORE TIME IN MINNESOTA

Lark sparrow
Tufted titmouse
Orchard oriole
Blue grosbeak
Western kingbird
Northern cardinal

SOME BIRDS THAT MAY SOON BE MOVING OUT OF MINNESOTA

Several species of warblers
Black-headed vireo
Olive-sided flycatcher
Purple finch
Dark-eyed junco
Boreal chickadee

 

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