Slideshow

Shop Sweet Home

Adam Braun, co-owner of Honeyshine, satisfies our curiosity with a tour of his midcentury modern home.

of
  • Honeyshine owner Adam Braun
    Photos by Eliesa Johnson
    Honeyshine owner Adam Braun in his Linden Hills store.
  • The kitchen of Honeyshine's Adam Braun
    Photos by Eliesa Johnson
    The biggest update at home was renovating the kitchen, where local contractor Mike North customized IKEA cabinetry by wrapping the exterior in walnut veneer.
  • The basement of Honeyshine's Adam Braun
    Photos by Eliesa Johnson
    The original basement bar looks like a corner of the store with glassware and entertaining accessories, styled immaculately.
  • Adam Braun, Kim Sauvageot and family
    Photos by Eliesa Johnson
    Braun with his wife Kim Sauvageot and kids Linh Mai, 6, and Boden, 3.
  • The Braun living room
    Photos by Eliesa Johnson
    Braun, who is the sun of Wild Rumpus owner Tom Braun, inherited a love for imaginative retail. Sauvageot inherited a vintage '60s buffet from her grandmother.
  • Honeyshine owner Adam Braun's basement bar
    Photos by Eliesa Johnson
    The original basement bar looks like a corner of the store with glassware and entertaining accessories, styled immaculately.
  • A succulent in the home of Adam Braun and Kim Sauvageot.
    Photos by Eliesa Johnson
  • Honeyshine owner Adam Braun's daughter's room
    Photos by Eliesa Johnson
    Linh Mai's bedroom.
  • Built-ins in Adam Braun's daughter's bedroom
    Photos by Eliesa Johnson
    The original wall built-ins in daughter Linh Mai's bedroom.
  • The shield painting in the master bedroom is by Honeyshine co-owner Daisy Mitchell.
    Photos by Eliesa Johnson
    The shield painting in the master bedroom is by Honeyshine co-owner Daisy Mitchell.

Last year’s documentary Scatter My Ashes at Bergdorf’s delved into the art of creating a world within a window display. You might say the Minneapolis version of eclectic storefront fantasy lives at Honeyshine, where a pair of mystical animal mannequins wear glitter masks in a lifelike scene packed with vintage props and objet d’art.

“They scare a few people, but most love them,” says Adam Braun, who co-owns the shop with Daisy Mitchell. “We change the windows every couple months,” says design consultant Kim Sauvageot, who dreams up the displays and is married to Braun. As Honeyshine bears the tagline “curiosity required,” it’s a thrill that Braun and Sauvageot are satisfying ours, inviting us into their midcentury rambler near Cedar Lake, which is stocked with many of the store’s same items, such as gold Dwell urchins, scented candles from Patch NYC, antique glassware, and Mitchell’s artwork.

The couple bought the home in 2011 from the original owners. They liked the generous radial plan and having all the main living spaces on one floor, perfect for their two kids, Linh Mai, 6, and Boden, 3. Since Braun and Sauvageot favor a modern-minimalist look, they kept much of the home in tact, including a Jetsons-like carport, original wood-paneled den, sunken living room, and built-in wall dressers. They managed to preserve the ’50s vibe while updating the rundown areas, gutting the kitchen, having the carpeted floors replaced with wood, and installing new lighting.

Then came the task of paint projects and styling, that extra level of window dressing detail. In the front sitting area, their wink comes into play with an apropos “Think of Your Own Ideas” graphic by Anthony Burrill, which they positioned in the middle of a charcoal gray painted cross—a project they mapped out with tape.

In the den, a bookcase serves as a giant curio cabinet filled with stacks of books, items from travels to Asia, heirloom decanters, little keys, and much more. “I feel like I can look at that cabinet over and over again and see some new fun detail each time,” says Sauvageot. “This is an approach we use at Honeyshine. We want you to see different, interesting, unexpected things every time you look in the store window.”

Boden’s room has a floor-to-ceiling painted chalkboard that mimics the store’s “Kiddyshine” corner, with a small military pouch from Tatters screwed into the wall for holding chalk. Layers of dark paint and faux shearling throw pillows and blankets made by Sauvageot’s mother add warmth and texture. Clients who hire Honeyshine for their interior design services and styling often request these parallels. Says Braun, “Our design service grew from people coming into the store and saying things like, ‘I just want to live in here.’”

 

Comments