Slideshow

Sandy Greenquist

Women's Health

of
  • Sandy Greenquist
    Photo by Becca Sabot
    “What keeps me going is how much women struggle and suffer, and how much difference I can make in the quality of a woman’s life.”
  • Sandy Greenquist
    Photo by Becca Sabot
    “I have had a variety of issues. But that is life. Life is going to go on. If we’re doing good things and we have our health, if we feel good, we can face most anything.”
  • Sandy Greenquist
    Photo by Becca Sabot
    “As women we are told that we are going to dry up and go away. I refuse. If you live long enough you get to do menopause. Let’s do it well.”

Certified Nurse-Midwife
Co-Owner and Director Menopause Center of Minnesota

“If you live long enough, you get to do menopause. Let’s do it well.”

When Sandy Greenquist had symptoms of early menopause, her OB-GYN sent her to a psychiatrist. It wasn’t the answer she was looking for, and she wasn’t alone. “Patients whose babies I had delivered were also getting older and having issues [like depression, dry skin, and a loss of sex drive],” Greenquist says.

No one had clear answers. “So I started going to conferences and getting my hands on everything I could read. And I talked one of the doctors I worked with into setting up a clinic just for midlife women’s health.” The Twin Cities’ “Midlife Midwife” was born.

Menopause has long been misunderstood by medicine, a reflection of our culture’s dismissiveness of women’s lives past child-rearing. “Women are hungry for information,” Greenquist says. Unfortunately, much of the information out there is wrong. Correcting it is what drives her. “Women have been told that hormone replacement therapy is bad, that if you take hormones you should only take them for a little while.” But there are widespread criticisms of the Women’s Health Initiative data on which most of those recommendations are based. And new studies show that hormone replacement therapy does not increase breast cancer risk if begun at the right time, and it may even decrease the risk of other diseases, Greenquist says.

Menopause is not the end; it’s “half-time,” Greenquist says. “It’s time to reassess where you are and what you’re doing, hold on to the things that are adding and improving to your life, and get rid of the things that are not.” She may not help you live longer, she says, “but I can help you live better.”

Case in point, Greenquist’s recent patient: “When she came in for her appointment, she leaned forward and said, ‘I just turned 83 and I had sex on my birthday.’”

Donald Brock

Donald Brock

Emergency Care

Jan Baller

Jan Baller

Lifetime Achievement

Johannes Koomen

Johannes Koomen

Long-Term Care

Laurel Edinburgh

Laurel Edinburgh

Children's Health

Cyrus Batheja

Cyrus Batheja

Administrative Leadership

Jodi Shewczyk

Jodi Shewczyk

Cancer Care

Erin Mehta

Erin Mehta

Clinic Setting

JoAnne Geiser

JoAnne Geiser

School Nurse

Gretchen Moen

Gretchen Moen

Nurse Practitioner

Jessica Quinlan-Woodward

Jessica Quinlan-Woodward

Hospital Setting

Jeff Paurus

Jeff Paurus

Nurse Educator

Jennifer Bucka

Jennifer Bucka

Rising Star

List of Finalists

These 49 finalists, combined with the 13 award winners, represent the top 25 percent of nurses nominated this year.

Comments