Beauty

Brazilian Blowout

Style editor Melissa Colgan tests the Brazilian Blowout service at Spalon Montage.

melissa colgan trying a brazilian blowout

Guinea Pig: Melissa Colgan
Small Print: Starts at $200 at Spalon Montage, three metro locations including 3909 W. 49th St., Edina, 952-915-2900, spalon.com

I’ve had a few horrifying hair experiences in my life, but nothing as terrible as when I had my sometimes-wavy-sometimes-curly hair chemically straightened. My locks were so fried from the process, and the regrowth line so ghastly, I had to go all Keri Russell and chop my clavicle-sweeping tresses to within an inch of my scalp.

Needless to say, I am paranoid about putting any chemicals in my hair. But when I received an e-mail touting a new treatment to temporarily straighten my locks without harsh chemicals, my interest was piqued enough to do some research. It turns out there are a number of treatments under the Brazilian moniker, but the Brazilian Blowout is different from many other straightening treatments in that its formula is a formaldehyde-free keratin (protein) treatment that doesn’t completely straighten the hair—it just eliminates frizz, softens curls, and cuts down on blow-dry time.

The process is straightforward. First, hair is washed clean with a clarifying shampoo. Next, the Brazilian Blowout solution is applied section by section before the hair is blow-dried completely. Then, the solution is further sealed in with a 450-degree straightening iron. Finally, the hair is washed and blow-dried once more, leaving it not unnaturally pin-straight, but frizz-free and full of body.

The result: When left to air-dry, my locks still have a bit of wave but no frizz. On the flip side, my blow-dry time has been cut in half, and my sideshow act involving multiple brushes and contortionist head angles is a thing of the past. And since the solution gradually washes out (it lasts about six weeks), I don’t have to worry about that dreaded line of demarcation. Now I truly have “wash and wear” hair.

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