Where and What to Eat

One Great Plate: Muesli

This breakfast of uncooked rolled oats, fruits, seeds, and nuts has heretofore been branded as hippie food.

Muesli

You know, it can be very fun to say: muesli . . . myooo-zlee. Introduced in the 1900s by Swiss doctor Maximilian Bircher-Benner (also fun to say), this breakfast of uncooked rolled oats, fruits, seeds, and nuts has heretofore been branded as hippie food, never quite achieving granola's scruffy-sexy status. Well, that might soon change, because there are two local companies making muesli and hoping you'll expand your breakfast routine to include this high-powered, nutritionally packed mix.

St. Paul's Bliss Granola is branching out with two kinds of Bircher muesli, which usually refers to a blend that is untoasted, unsweetened, and eaten after soaking in milk in the fridge all night. Not only does the soaking make it creamy and good, but in the triple berry flavor it really relaxes the tasty Wisconsin berries and Minnesota oats.

The duo behind Seven Sundays was inspired by the breakfasts they had while in New Zealand. First introduced at the Midtown Farmers Market, it uses local ingredients and sustainable packaging to make four flavors: original with 14 ingredients, vanilla cherry pecan, Bircher untoasted, and ginger pear macadamia, which has a good spicy hit from the ground ginger. If you're not keen on the presoak, you can mix your muesli in with yogurt or juice, pour it in hot water for a porridge, add it to muffins or pancakes, or simply stick in a spoon and eat it over the sink. No judgment—it's that good for you.

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