Richard Davis

Richard Davis
Illustration by Randall Nelson
2013 Volunteer Hall of Fame: Richard Davis

Day job: Chairman, president, and CEO of US Bancorp
Volunteerism: United Way, Minnesota Business Partnership, YMCA of Minneapolis, Guthrie Theater, Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minnesota Orchestra

He makes it sound so simple: “I like to be involved with things I care about and like,” Richard Davis says. But encouraging others to donate their time and money is a challenge, even when you’re the top executive at US Bancorp, a company that supports community involvement, matches employee donations, and encourages employees to spend some work hours volunteering.

“There are a fair percentage of people who still don’t give here at all yet because they haven’t figured out how. They don’t know how to break the ice or what to do about it," he says. Davis worked hard to change that when he ran the Greater Twin Cities United Way Annual Fund. "I did well more than 75 corporate meetings to talk about the campaign—encourage people to think differently, volunteer, follow with money, give to United Way, all of that,” he says.

Davis’s commitment to United Way extends beyond his work life. He and his wife, Theresa Davis, co-chaired United Way’s Annual Campaign in 2010 and raised more than $88 million to support efforts to help people overcome poverty. He also co-chairs a program called Step-Up, which connects kids in public schools with professionals as they move from high school to college. “There’s something about intersecting with young people at a certain point in their life—[they] get a chance to change their view of what’s possible in our community,” Davis says.

With people like Davis working to strengthen our community, end poverty, and connect young people with business leaders, the possibilities for success seem endless.

Kim Valentini

Kim Valentini

As she approached a midlife crossroads, Kim Valentini did some soul-searching, which led to a promising new career.

Sondra Samuels

Sondra Samuels

Fed up with the problems in her neighborhood, the successful diversity consultant had ideas on how to remedy them.

Leonard  Gloeb

Leonard Gloeb

This master gardener can grow anything, but his favorite thing to see blossom is the smile on a sick child’s face.

John  Kelly

John Kelly

Accountant John Kelly makes sure the ARC Greater Twin Cities has the funding it needs to support those with special needs.

Elise Linehan

Elise Linehan

Elise Linehan is goal-oriented. That’s what drew her to Project SUCCESS nine years ago.

Charlie Quimby

Charlie Quimby

He spends his days reading books, painting, and teaching kids ages 3 to 5 the things they need to know to be ready for kindergarten—and eventually to vote.

Mike  Fiterman

Mike Fiterman

His plan of attack: give kids tools and a purpose.

Madeline Titus

Madeline Titus

This high school student is all about We Day and its teachings.

Lynn Casey

Lynn Casey

A communicator, connector, and business leader gives where she lives.

Arthur Rouner

Arthur Rouner

A former minister does the impossible: teaching bitter enemies to forgive each other.

Comments